Wednesday, February 7, 2007

Robert Burns Friday + Art

Friday we're off to part II of a lively discussion of the work of Robert Burns, the national poet of Scotland, best known as the author of Auld Lang Syne. Burns' work at first glance may appear simplistic, melodramatic and too "cute" for modern tastes. But in-depth analysis brings to light a subtle genius and a great invitation to the "everyman" to acknowledge such philoshophical musings as pantheism (To A Mouse, On Turning Her Up In Her Nest With The Plough), universal brotherhood (Tragic Fragment), and psychology (Remorse). And half the poems are songs, like half of the best poems of the past 50 years (see Rolling Stones, Beatles, etc.). We'll be discussing Burns at The White Horse, that stalwart NYC establishment that proved to be the undoing of Dylan Thomas, who, according to Wikipedia, "collapsed (there) on November 9, 1953 ... after drinking heavily while on a promotional speaking tour (and) later died at St. Vincent's Hospital." We hope not to suffer the same fate Friday, because after the Burns study...

... it's off to The Salmagundi Club for what's sure to be a fantastic show of 38 fantastic living artists. Opening is 6–9 Friday, Feb. 9th, at the Salmagundi Club, 47 5th Ave. (between 11th & 12th). And it's free...

1 comment:

Ms. K said...

Thanks for the Burns primer. I was wondering how it went...You'll like the Salmagundi Club. Very church basement-Saturday night dance at the local Veteran's Hall kind of place. They have a weekly figure-drawing session I've been meaning to go to for about 3 years.